Explosions and Fires

Reduce methane expl. fire risk improve ventilation in miner headings
Reduce methane expl.  fire risk improve ventilation in miner headings
Reduce methane expl. fire risk evaluate dynamic goaf ventilation
Reduce methane expl.  fire risk evaluate dynamic goaf ventilation
Ranging path remote methane detector
An earlier SIMRAC project, GEN 705, successfully demonstrated that the Open Path Remote Sensing (OPRES) based technology could be used for the detection of methane gas in the mining environment.  The technology is based on
Ranging open path remote flammable gas detection monitoring device
Ranging open path remote flammable gas detection monitoring device
Quantification of methane behaviour in continuous miner headings
In order to quantitatively assess the effect a ventilation system has on in-heading methane control around a continuous miner, the amount of methane released into the heading needs to be known. This can only be done in the controlled
Procedures to overcome disorientation and visibility after explosions
Poor visibility and disorientation following a fire or an explosion represent major considetations in the development of escape strategies.  Apart from the obvious complications such as injuries and the fact that underground personnel
Prevention detection control of underground fires in coal mines
A statistical review is given of the frequency of fires and flammable gas ignitions in South African underground coal mines, both on a simple numerical basis and in relation to underground coal production, for the years 1970 - 1992.
Occurence emission ignition of combustable strata gases in Wits mines
The review output of the project comprised three main sections, literature, gas incidents and accidents, and technical interviews with mine personnel. Literature covered combustible gas emissions in mining operations in South Africa
Methane layering in bord and pillar workings
Methane layering in bord and pillar workings
Investigate conditions where HFC 134a becomes explosive
A catastrophic failure of an underground refrigeration plant, retrofitted with HFC134a refrigerant (Tua Tona 1999), highlighted the need to investigate and understand conditions under which HFC134a may become dangerous or explosive.