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MHSC OFFICIAL e-NEWSLETTER JUNE 2019

Explosives Regulations Amendments Note

The safety of mine workers is our priority as it is every mine worker’s right to work in a safe environment. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) together with the Mine Health and Safety Council (MHSC) are working to ensure that the number of occupational injuries and fatalities decreases in South African mines. The DMRE and the MHSC are striving for the journey to Zero Harm where by every mine worker returns home from work unharmed every day.

 

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MHSC NEWSLETTERS MARCH 2019

The 4IR in the SA Mining

On 21 February 2019, 52 stakeholder representatives of the MHSC converged at the Glenhove Conference Centre in Johannesburg to attend a workshop on the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the MHSC, Mr Thabo Dube, hosted the workshop.

In his opening statement, Mr Dube remarked that, in countries where the mining industry is a key component of the economy, for example, Australia, technology and mechanisation are already at an advanced stage. This is because the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) is about digitisation and the Internet of Things (IoT), as opposed to the Third Industrial Revolution, which focused on the internet and information technology.

During the event, the Organised Labour Convenor of the MHSC, Mr Mziwakhe Nhlapo, conducted a moment of silence in remembrance of the workers who lost their lives in the mining industry due to accidents and diseases. He stated that, according to statistics released by the Department of Mineral Resources, five mine workers have lost their lives since January 2019. This is compared to 13 mine workers during the same period in 2018. However, one life lost is one too many. 

Working towards implementation 

The purpose of the workshop was outlined by Dr Lindiwe Ndelu. Important points included the following: 

To introduce the concept of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to the MHSC and its stakeholders: Stakeholders need to understand, internalise, reflect and engage with the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and consider how it is going to impact on the MHSC and the sector, especially as it relates to its mandate of occupational health and safety. Its implications for job losses and the changing nature of work within the industry must also be discussed. 

To review the research need analysis process and support services in alignment with trends brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution: This will enhance outcomes from the Safety In Mines Research Advisory Committee (SIMRAC) workshop on the research need analysis process. 

To emphasise the fact that the Fourth Industrial Revolution provides powerful objects, enablers and tools that can be used to improve lives: Artificial intelligence and robotic surgical methods have proven to be useful in the health sector. They have led to the reduction of infections in surgical wounds. It is thus crucial for the MHSC and the sector to see the opportunities and advances brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 

To ensure that we keep up to date with developments around artificial intelligence: The Fourth Industrial Revolution is about digitisation and the IoT. Prior to the workshop, the MHSC reconfirmed its resolution to do away with paper in conducting its business. It is thus starting the process of actively participating in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 

To encourage a holistic approach to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in order to address the opportunities and challenges it presents in the mining sector, communities and government. 

I n his opening statement, Mr Dube remarked that, in countries where the mining industry is a key component of the economy, for example, Australia, technology and mechanisation are already at an advanced stage. This is because the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) is about digitisation and the Internet of Things (IoT), as opposed to the Third Industrial Revolution, which focused on the internet and information technology.

During the event, the Organised Labour Convenor of the MHSC, Mr Mziwakhe Nhlapo, conducted a moment of silence in remembrance of the workers who lost their lives in the mining industry due to accidents and diseases. He stated that, according to statistics released by the Department of Mineral Resources, five mine workers have lost their lives since January 2019. This is compared to 13 mine workers during the same period in 2018. However, one life lost is one too many. 

Working towards implementation 

The purpose of the workshop was outlined by Dr Lindiwe Ndelu. Important points included the following: 

  • To introduce the concept of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to the MHSC and its stakeholders: Stakeholders need to understand, internalise, reflect and engage with the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and consider how it is going to impact on the MHSC and the sector, especially as it relates to its mandate of occupational health and safety. Its implications for job losses and the changing nature of work within the industry must also be discussed. 
  • To review the research need analysis process and support services in alignment with trends brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution: This will enhance outcomes from the Safety In Mines Research Advisory Committee (SIMRAC) workshop on the research need analysis process. 
  • To emphasise the fact that the Fourth Industrial Revolution provides powerful objects, enablers and tools that can be used to improve lives: Artificial intelligence and robotic surgical methods have proven to be useful in the health sector. They have led to the reduction of infections in surgical wounds. It is thus crucial for the MHSC and the sector to see the opportunities and advances brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 
  • To ensure that we keep up to date with developments around artificial intelligence: The Fourth Industrial Revolution is about digitisation and the IoT. Prior to the workshop, the MHSC reconfirmed its resolution to do away with paper in conducting its business. It is thus starting the process of actively participating in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 
  • To encourage a holistic approach to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in order to address the opportunities and challenges it presents in the mining sector, communities and government.

 

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MHSC Newsletter December 2018

Mine Medical Professionals Association

The Mine Medical Professionals Association (MMPA), in conjunction with the Mine Health and Safety Council (MMPA), held its 21st Annual congress at the Sun City Resort. The event was held over two days on the 26th to the 27th of October 2018 under the theme, “4th Industrial Revolution- are we ready”? The theme was meant to prompt health personnel to start the discussions on the need to get ahead of the game and use all technology possible to be proactive in the prevention of diseases and injuries , and more specifically in the mining sector. 

The Congress was attended by participants from different disciplines as they ranged from occupational medical practitioners (OMPs), occupational health practitioners (OHPs), occupational therapists, medical practitioners in mining; researchers, subject-matter experts in mental health, and occupational hygiene experts; to the Masoyise iTB Team, health economists and actuarial scientists as experts on National Health Insurance, and the Mine Health and Safety Council research team. 

Of note at the Congress was the session which covered, in detail, the problem of mental health and the vulnerability of doctors to stress and depression. The discussion on National Health Insurance also served to the delegates how universal health coverage will work in the South African context. It became very clear that a South African solution has to be developed, taking the current systems and legacy issues into account. 

In promoting the work done by the MHSC and through the Centre of Excellence, printed material relevant to the delegates were issued as well presented on by the MHSC and the researchers who undertook the projects. The projects presented on were the following: 

a) Develop Methodologies for the Measurement of Diesel Exhaust Emissions (DEE) and Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM); 

b) A Situational Analysis for Occupational Health Practitioners with Specific Reference to Section 12(1) and Section 13(3)(A)(I) of the MHSA on the applicable ratio to service the mines in order to make a meaningful impact to the improvement of occupational health in SAMI; 

c) The Reproducibility of Digital X-Ray and Analog X-Ray readings for Medical Surveillance in the South African Mining Industry to determine the reproducibility of digital and analog chest radiography for detection of silicosis and silicosis plus Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

In conclusion, the delegates agreed that something has to be done with regards to the current approach to health provision in the sector, as the concern is that occupational health and mental health are not prioritized in the current health framework. 

 

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MHSC JOURNEY DECEMBER 2017

Dear MHSC staff

Would like to first start by appreciating each and every staff Imember of the Mine Health and Safety Council for all of your hard work. Your hard work does not go unnoticed. 2017 has been one of the busiest years with lots of challenges but we pulled through as a team. 

This year we were busy with the implementation of the Centre of Excellence. A game changer for the industry and the Mine Health and Safety Council. Indeed we have great work planned for the Council in 2018. We are being joined by new staff members with more staff joining us in the new year. The MHSC family is growing and this should translate to the increase of the MHSC footprint in the South African Mining Industry. 

The clean audit is another highlight for the Mine Health and Safety Council. What the clean audit means is that the financial statements are free from material misstatements (in other words, a financially unqualified audit opinion) and there are no material findings on reporting on performance objectives or noncompliance with legislation. This is a trend we should continue with as the Council

To all the Business Units – well done on your achievements this year. In areas where we need to improve; it's doable and let us make those necessary improvements. May we start the New Year with g r e a t e r e n e r g y, a g r e a t e r determination to succeed and a renewed commitment to be the best at what we do. Take care of yourselves as you spend time with your loved ones; be safe on the roads!

Thabo Dube MHSC CEO

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